March with DMA in the Darien Memorial Day Parade
Monday May 25, 2015, 9:30am

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Spend an hour honoring those who served and gave their lives, and have a good time with fellow members of the DMA.

Save June 10 for our upcoming must attend “Weed Beach Soiree”

Weed Beach Soiree Flyer

June 3, 2015
The Darien Senior Songsters present a Barbershop Harmony Concert

Darien Senior SongstersJoin us at our last Member Meeting on June 3 and enjoy our own DMA Senior Songsters, a bunch of stout-hearted senior men who enjoy performing a selection of Barbershop Harmony, Broadway, and Spiritual songs.

Guests are welcome so bring your wife, significant other, or other guests with you.

May-June 2015 Newsletter Flipbook

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May 27, 2015
Bob Masterson, Ph.D., Discusses Reactive Physics and Nuclear Power Engineering

Dr. Bob Masterson earned his Ph.D. in Nuclear Engineering at MIT.

Bob will discuss the basics of reactive physics and nuclear power engineering, and offer an up-to-date approach to the newest nuclear reactor designs and computer applications.

May 21, 2015
Circle Line Landmark Cruise, Boarding at 8:00 am in the DCA parking lot

Take this opportunity to enjoy the Circle Line Landmark Cruise around Manhattan and see Midtown Manhattan, the Empire State Building, One World Trade Center, Lower Manhattan,  Ellis Island, Statue of Liberty, The Battery, Brooklyn Bridge and the United Nations.

Cost: $85.00 per person

May 20, 2015
Mark Albertson on the WW l Treaty of Versailles and its Aftermath

Mark Albertson

Mark Albertson

The Treaty of Versailles (French: Traité de Versailles) was one of the peace treaties at the end of World War I. It ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers. It was signed on 28 June 1919, exactly five years after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. The other Central Powers on the German side of World War I were dealt with in separate treaties. Although the armistice, signed on 11 November 1918, ended the actual fighting, it took six months of negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference to conclude the peace treaty. The treaty was registered by the Secretariat of the League of Nations on 21 October 1919, and was printed in The League of Nations Treaty Series.

Of the many provisions in the treaty, one of the most important and controversial required “Germany [to] accept the responsibility of Germany and her allies for causing all the loss and damage” during the war (the other members of the Central Powers signed treaties containing similar articles). This article, Article 231, later became known as the War Guilt clause. The treaty forced Germany to disarm, make substantial territorial concessions, and pay reparations to certain countries that had formed the Entente powers. In 1921 the total cost of these reparations was assessed at 132 billion Marks (then $31.4 billion or £6.6 billion, roughly equivalent to US $442 billion or UK £284 billion in 2015). At the time economists, notably John Maynard Keynes predicted that the treaty was too harsh—a “Carthaginian peace”, and said the figure was excessive and counter-product ive. The contemporary American historian Sally Marks judged the reparation figure to be lenient, a sum that was designed to look imposing but was in fact not, that had little impact on the German economy and analysed the treaty as a whole to be quite restrained and not as harsh as it could have been.

May 14, 2015
Hiking in the Babcock Preserve

Babcock Preserve

Join us for Hiking in the Babcock Preserve on Thursday May 14, 2015

The Babcock Preserve is a 300-acre tract of forested land in Greenwich, north of the Merritt Parkway. It is the largest park in Greenwich and comprises several hiking trails over a relatively easy terrain. It was acquired by the Town of Greenwich in 1972, partially by gift, and partially by purchase from the Babcock Family.

May 13, 2015
Peter Georgescu, Chairman Emeritus, Young & Rubicam

Peter Georgescu

Peter Georgescu

Peter Andrew Georgescu, Chairman Emeritus of Young & Rubicam, was born on the eve of the Second World War in Bucharest, Romania. His Romanian parents were educated in England and France. Peter’s father was the Managing Director of Exxon’s operation in Romania. While on a business trip to New York in 1947, the Iron Curtain fell and Peter’s parents could not return to Romania. Overnight they became the enemy of the Communist regime (his father would have been killed if he’d returned to Romania). Peter and his brother were left in Romania with his grandparents and would remain apart from his mother and father for eight years. His grandfather was seized and imprisoned as a political threat, and then murdered in captivity. Shortly after his grandfather was taken away, Peter, only nine years old, was arrested along with his brother and grandmother and sent to a work camp. In 1953 his father was approached by Romanian Communist diplomats in New York and asked to spy for them in exchange for “good treatment” for the children. Georgescu’s parents refused and went to the press, causing an international scandal. With the intervention of Congressman Frances Bolton and President Eisenhower, the boys were reunited with their parents in April of 1954.

Peter’s American journey started with a gifted admission to Exeter Academy in the fall of 1954—which generously overlooked his inability to speak English and having had no formal schooling since second grade. He attended Princeton and earned an MBA degree from Stanford Business School. In 1963 he entered Young & Rubicam as a trainee in their research department. Thirty-seven years later he retired as Chairman and CEO of Young & Rubicam with Y&R at the pinnacle of the advertising and related communications industry.

May 6, 2015
Julia Wade, Director of Volunteers, Domus

Julia Wade, Domus Director of Volunteers

Julia Wade

Since 1972, Domus has helped thousands of our region’s most vulnerable youth experience success. Domus is the Latin noun for home, which is where our roots are: We opened our doors as a group home for homeless boys and stay in touch with many of them. We also keep home and all its positive connotations in mind as we create loving relationships and warm, loving places to heal from trauma.

Our goal for the young people we serve is to create the conditions necessary for them to get on a path toward health and opportunity so they can engage and succeed in school and ultimately have satisfying and productive lives. Our programs–schools, community programs, and residential programs–lead youth to that path.

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