Month: April 2017 (page 1 of 2)

Chess Club

Looking for a challenging game of chess?

The DMA Chess Club welcomes players of all levels.

We meet Mondays, 12:30-3:00 at the Mather Center.


For more information contact Tony Kwedar

 

Mianus River Park Hike
April 28, 2017, 10AM

Mianus River Park Hike
scheduled for Friday April 28, 2017 at 10am
Merriebrook Lane, Stamford
The 400 acre Mianus River Park straddles the towns of Stamford and Greenwich and is owned jointly by them. Its dramatic landscape includes the Mianus River and its tributary streams, a hilly terrain, hiking trails, rock formations and plentiful widflowers. We have hiked here before but this time we will be trying a new, more interesting trail.This trail starts with climbing a hill followed by the slope easing off into a comfortable hike.

More about the park can be found at:
Mianus River Park

We will hike approximately 3.5 miles and, starting at 10am, be done by about 12.30 pm.

As usual, participation from spouses, significant others and friends is welcome.

The hike will be followed by lunch(optional) at the Mackenzie Bar and Grill located at 970 High Ridge Road, Stamford.
Date & Time : Friday, April 28, 2017 at 10 am

Meeting Point: Parking lot at the Stamford entrance of the Mianus River Park on Merriebrook Lane, off Westover Road
Parking. : lower level, just below the large red cabin on the right side of Merriebrook

Directions: . Search for Merriebrook Lane in Stamford on google maps or follow these
directions:
Heading south towards NYC on the Merritt take exit 33 on to Den Road . Then take the first left on to Bangall Road and a left again on to Riverbank Rd. This turns slightly right and becomes Westover Road. After 1.2 miles, make a right on to Merriebrook Lane( careful, it’s easy to miss this turn). The park entrance and parking lot is ¼ mile down the hill on Merriebrook.

Contact. : Sunil Saksena.
ssaksena44@gmail.com
203-561-8601 cell

Cheese Boards

Sometimes there is a scrap of lumber laying around that you are sure there MUST be a good use for.   Here the Woodworkers took scraps of contrasting wood, joined, glued, planed, sanded and finished them to make attractive cheese boards.

 

 

Boy Scout Tag Sale 2017

Several pieces of furniture donated to the Boy Scout Tag Sale were in need of repair.  The problems included broken legs and a split top.  In the condition they were in, they would bring only a low price – or possibly have to be junked.

The DMA Woodworkers were able to repair a doll’s barn, table, secretary and hope chest to usable condition.  They should bring a good price for a good cause.

 

The Polish Officer
Alan Furst

Capt. Alexander de Milja is a chameleon. A cartographer by profession, de Milja works as an intelligence officer in the Polish underground at the outset of World War II. When the Germans discover de Milja’s identity in Poland, he goes to France and later Russia to continue his work. Under a series of false identities, mingling with the bon vivants of occupied Paris, he becomes a prized intelligence resource, surviving by cunning and passing valuable strategic information to the British. De Milja is in even more danger, working as a saboteur based in a Ukrainian forest as the Germans march east. De Milja’s disguises are many-he passes as a Russian writer, a Czech coal merchant, and a Polish horse breeder-and he embraces each persona completely as he goes about the business of espionage and sabotage. De Milja comes across as a genuine individual who, in his weaker moments, grapples with his desire to give up the fight. This well-written, realistic novel paints a vivid picture of the grayness and despair of the German occupation.

Recommended by Tom Reifenheiser

And the Show Went on :
Cultural Life in Nazi-occupied Paris
Alan Riding

In the weeks after the Germans captured Paris, theaters, opera houses, and nightclubs reopened to occupiers and French citizens alike, and they remained open for the duration of the war. Alan Riding introduces a pageant of twentieth-century artists who lived and worked under the Nazis and explores the decisions each made about whether to stay or flee, collaborate or resist.We see Maurice Chevalier and Edith Piaf singing before French and German audiences; Picasso painting and occasionally selling his work from his Left Bank apartment; and Marcel Carne and Henri-Georges Clouzot, among others, directing movies in Paris studios (more than two hundred were produced during this time). We see that pro-Fascist writers such as Louis-Ferdinand Celine and Robert Brasillach flourished, but also that Camus’s The Stranger was published and Sartre’s play No Exit was first performed-ten days before the Normandy landings.Based on exhaustive research and extensive interviews, And the Show Went On sheds a clarifying light on a protean and problematic era in twentieth-century European cultural history

Recommended by David Mace

The Cost of Courage
Charles Kaiser

This heroic true story of the three youngest children of a bourgeois Catholic family who worked together in the French Resistance is told by an American writer who has known and admired the family for five decades. In the autumn of 1943, Andre Boulloche became de Gaulle’s military delegate in Paris, coordinating all the Resistance movements in the nine northern regions of France only to be betrayed by one of his associates, arrested, wounded by the Gestapo, and taken prisoner. His sisters carried on the fight without him until the end of the war. Andre survived three concentration camps and later became a prominent French politician who devoted the rest of his life to reconciliation of France and Germany. His parents and oldest brother were arrested and shipped off on the last train from Paris to Germany before the liberation, and died in the camps. Since then, silence has been the Boulloches’s answer to dealing with the unbearable. This is the first time the family has cooperated with an author to recount their extraordinary ordeal.

Recommended by Taylor Strubinger

The Paris Architect : a Novel
Charles Belfoure

A beautiful and elegant account of an ordinary man’s unexpected and reluctant descent into heroism during the second world war.” —Malcolm Gladwell A thrilling debut novel of World War II Paris, from an author who’s been called “an up and coming Ken Follett.” (Booklist) In 1942 Paris, gifted architect Lucien Bernard accepts a commission that will bring him a great deal of money – and maybe get him killed. But if he’s clever enough, he’ll avoid any trouble. All he has to do is design a secret hiding place for a wealthy Jewish man, a space so invisible that even the most determined German officer won’t find it. He sorely needs the money, and outwitting the Nazis who have occupied his beloved city is a challenge he can’t resist. But when one of his hiding spaces fails horribly, and the problem of where to hide a Jew becomes terribly personal, Lucien can no longer ignore what’s at stake. The Paris Architect asks us to consider what we owe each other, and just how far we’ll go to make things right. Written by an architect whose knowledge imbues every page, this story becomes more gripping with every soul hidden and every life saved.

Recommended by Jan Selkowitz and Burt von Stuelpnagel.

Avenue of Spies
a True Story of Terror, Espionage, and One American Family’s Heroic Resistance in Nazi-occupied France

Alex Kershwaw

The best-selling author of The Liberator brings to life the incredible true story of an American doctor in Paris, and his heroic espionage efforts during World War II The leafy Avenue Foch, one of the most exclusive residential streets in Nazi-occupied France, was Paris’s hotbed of daring spies, murderous secret police, amoral informers, and Vichy collaborators. So when American physician Sumner Jackson, who lived with his wife and young son Phillip at Number 11, found himself drawn into the Liberation network of the French resistance, he knew the stakes were impossibly high. Just down the road at Number 31 was the “mad sadist” Theodor Dannecker, an Eichmann protégé charged with deporting French Jews to concentration camps. And Number 84 housed the Parisian headquarters of the Gestapo, run by the most effective spy hunter in Nazi Germany. From his office at the American Hospital, itself an epicenter of Allied and Axis intrigue, Jackson smuggled fallen Allied fighter pilots safely out of France, a job complicated by the hospital director’s close ties to collaborationist Vichy. After witnessing the brutal round-up of his Jewish friends, Jackson invited Liberation to officially operate out of his home at Number 11–but the noose soon began to tighten. When his secret life was discovered by his Nazi neighbors, he and his family were forced to undertake a journey into the dark heart of the war-torn continent from which there was little chance of return. Drawing upon a wealth of primary source material and extensive interviews with Phillip Jackson, Alex Kershaw recreates the City of Light during its darkest days. The untold story of the Jackson family anchors the suspenseful narrative, and Kershaw dazzles readers with the vivid immediacy of the best spy thrillers. Awash with the tense atmosphere of World War II’s Europe, Avenue of Spies introduces us to the brave doctor who risked everything to defy Hitler.

An interesting fact about this book is that two grand uncles of one of our members, Burt von Stuelpnagel, are in the book.

Recommended by Taylor Strubinger and Burt von Stuelpnagel

2017 Annual Cookout at Weed Beach
Thursday, June 15, 2017


Join us for a gourmet Sunset Picnic at Weed Beach on Thursday, June 15, 2017,5:00-8:30.

No food to bring just come and enjoy. Family and friends are welcome.

Just $35 per person – A great value which includes Wine, Beer, Soft Drinks, Scrumptious Appetizers, Chicken, Salmon, Beef and many sides plus great desserts.

DSCN4362_1080

Our picnic last year was a huge success and we expect this year to be even better!

Catering provided by Valvala’s Deli & Catering

Appetizers : Sliders, Chips with Salsa and Guacamole, Shrimp,  Salad,  Cheese & Crackers

Dinner: Salmon, Chicken, Beef

Dessert: Sheet cake, Cookies. Fruit

PLUS! Wine, Beer, Soft Drinks and Water

DSCN4382_1080 Socialize with your friends and make some new ones while eating gourmet food and enjoying music by a talented one-man band, Rob Smith.

 

RAIN DATE is June 16, 2017

Any questions contact Alex Garnett

Pictures: https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipNXG1u21fuHy8xSPSbQbTZIXE1O2W4IQZ8x44PdOb6gYoXFkUDDMl8tRhh93lVPSQ?key=eHVobHcyNEl6YWU2S1pYRFJ6eUZ1TmMybmxnalpR

Dereliction of Duty
H. R. McMaster

From respected Lieutenant General and Trump Administration National Security Adviser H. R. McMaster, an authoritative, highly critical analysis of the arrogance, deception, and controversial decisions at the highest level of government that led to America’s involvement in the Vietnam War. “The war in Vietnam was not lost in the field, nor was it lost on the front pages of the New York Times or the college campuses. It was lost in Washington, D.C.” —H. R. McMaster (from the Conclusion) Dereliction Of Duty is a stunning analysis of how and why the United States became involved in an all-out and disastrous war in Southeast Asia. Fully and convincingly researched, based on transcripts and personal accounts of crucial meetings, confrontations and decisions, it is the only book that fully re-creates what happened and why. McMaster pinpoints the policies and decisions that got the United States into the morass and reveals who made these decisions and the motives behind them, disproving the published theories of other historians and excuses of the participants. A page-turning narrative, Dereliction Of Duty focuses on a fascinating cast of characters: President Lyndon Johnson, Robert McNamara, General Maxwell Taylor, McGeorge Bundy and other top aides who deliberately deceived the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the U.S. Congress and the American public. McMaster’s only book, Dereliction of Duty is an explosive and authoritative new look at the controversy concerning the United States involvement in Vietnam

July 12, 2017
Book Discussion:
Last Hope Island
Lynne Olsen

When the Nazi Blitzkrieg subjugated Europe in World War II, London became the safe haven for the leaders of seven occupied countries–France, Belgium, Holland, Luxembourg, Norway, Czechoslovakia and Poland–who fled there to avoid imprisonment and set upgovernments in exile to commandeer their resistance efforts. The lone hold-out against Hitler’s offensive, Britain became a beacon of hope to the rest of Europe, as prominent European leaders like French general Charles De Gaulle, Queen Wilhelmina of Holland, and King Haakon of Norway competed for Winston Churchill’s attention while trying to rule their embattled countries from the precarious safety of ‘Last Hope Island'”

Review from the NYT’s: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/05/books/review/last-hope-island-lynne-olson.html 

Companion book: “Avenue of Spies” by Alex Kershaw. There is one paper copy and 2 audio copies in the Library. Recommended by Taylor Strubinger.

 

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