Month: May 2017 (page 1 of 2)

Let There Be Water : Israel’s Solution for a Water-starved World by Seth M Siegel

As every day brings urgent reports of growing water shortages around the world, there is no time to lose in the search for solutions. The US government predicts that forty of our fifty states-and sixty percent of the earth’s land surface-will soon face alarming gaps between available water and the growing demand for it. Without action, food prices will rise, economic growth will slow, and political instability is likely to follow.Let There Be Water illustrates how Israel can serve as a model for the US and countries everywhere by showing how to blunt the worst of the coming water calamities.Even with sixty percent of its country a desert, not only doesn’t Israel have a water problem; it has an abundance of water. Israel even supplies water to its neighbors-the Palestinians and the Kingdom of Jordan-every day.Based on meticulous research and hundreds of interviews, Let There Be Water reveals the methods and techniques of the often off-beat inventors who enabled Israel to lead the world in cutting-edge water technology. Let There Be Water also tells unknown stories of how cooperation on water systems can forge diplomatic ties and promote unity. Remarkably, not long ago, now-hostile Iran relied on Israel to manage its water systems, and access to Israel’s water know-how helped to warm China’s frosty relations with Israel. Every town, every country, and every reader can benefit from learning what Israel did in order to transform itself from a parched land into a water superpower.Beautifully written, Let There Be Water is an inspiring account of vision and sacrifice that will long be admired by government officials and engaged citizens facing water shortages and other seemingly insurmountable challenges.

Recommended by Jim Phillips. The Library has a copy.

Golf Outing: Sterling Farms Golf Course in Stamford, Tuesday, June 20, 2017, 10 a.m.

The first outing this year is at Sterling Farms Golf Course in Stamford, Tuesday, June 20, 2017, 10 a.m.

To sign up, email Peter Carnes at picarnes@gmail.com.

Provide your handicap to facilitate pairings.

Fee is $46. Includes cart.

Confirmation and coordination will be via email during the week prior to play.

Link to Sterling Farms: http://www.sterlingfarmsgc.com/

On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century by Timothy Snyder

The Founding Fathers tried to protect us from the threat they knew, the tyranny that overcame ancient democracy. Today, our political order faces new threats, not unlike the totalitarianism of the twentieth century. We are no wiser than the Europeans who saw democracy yield to fascism, Nazism, or communism. Our one advantage is that we might learn from their experience.

Recommended by Jim Phillips

Golf Outing: Tuesday, June 20, 2017, 10:00 Sterling Farms CC

$46, See Peter Carnes.

A Fine Mess : A Global Quest for a Simpler, Fairer, and More Efficient Tax System by T. R. Reid

New York Times bestelling author T. R. Reid travels around the world to solve the urgent problem of America’s failing tax code, unravelling a complex topic in plain English – and telling a rollicking story along the way.

The U.S. tax code is a total write-off. Crammed with loopholes and special interest provisions, it works for no one except tax lawyers, accountants, and huge corporations. Not for the first time, we have reached a breaking point. That happened in 1922, and again in 1954, and again in 1986. In other words, every thirty-two years. Which means that the next complete overhaul is due in 2018. But what should be in this new tax code? Can we make the U.S. tax system simpler, fairer, and more efficient? Yes, yes, and yes. Can we cut tax rates and still bring in more revenue? Yes.

Other rich countries, from Estonia to New Zealand to the UK—advanced, high-tech, free-market democracies—have all devised tax regimes that are equitable, effective, and easy on the taxpayer. But the United States has languished. So byzantine are the current statutes that, by our government’s own estimates, Americans spend six billion hours and $10 billion every year preparing and filing their taxes. In the Netherlands that task takes a mere fifteen minutes! Successful American companies like Apple, Caterpillar, and Google effectively pay no tax at all in some instances because of loopholes that allow them to move profits offshore. Indeed, the dysfunctional tax system has become a major cause of economic inequality.

In A Fine Mess, T. R. Reid crisscrosses the globe in search of the exact solutions to these urgent problems. With an uncanny knack for making a complex subject not just accessible but gripping, he investigates what makes good taxation (no, that’s not an oxymoron) and brings that knowledge home where it is needed most. Never talking down or reflexively siding with either wing of politics, T. R. Reid presses the case for sensible root-and-branch reforms with a companionable ebullience. This affects everyone. Doing our taxes will never be America’s favorite pastime, but it can and should be so much easier and fairer.

Recommended by Gary Banks.

Michael Howard Savage
Passes Away

Michael Howard Savage
Born in Bridgeport, CT
Departed on May 12, 2017 and resided in Darien, CT.

Service: Saturday, Jun. 3, 2017 http://www.lawrencefuneralhome.com/_mgxroot/page_10780.php?id=1728161

Michael Howard Savage, 78, passed away on Friday, May 12, 2017, surrounded by his family at his home in Darien. Michael was born in Bridgeport in 1938, son of the late Manuel and Lillian Savage. He grew up in Hollis Hills, New York.

Michael graduated from Dartmouth College with a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology. He was a member of the swimming team and served as pianist for the Dartmouth Symphony Orchestra. He also earned a Master’s Degree in Guidance and Education and a Ph.D. in Educational Administration from New York University.

For more than 37 years, Michael worked in the field of education, primarily with the New York State Education Department with responsibility for Federal, New York State and New York City funded programs in public schools in Manhattan, Queens, Brooklyn, The Bronx, and Staten Island, as well as Nassau, Suffolk, Westchester and Putnam counties. He was also responsible for New York State School Registration for all public and private elementary and secondary schools in the New York metro area. Following his retirement from the New York State Education Department, Michael was a Consultant to the New York City Board of Education, advising on Federal and State funded educational programs.

Michael remained actively involved with his alma maters until his death. He served as a member of the Executive Committees of the Dartmouth Club of New York and the Dartmouth Alumni Association of New York City for more than 35 years. He was also a member of the Dartmouth Club of Fairfield County and the Dartmouth Club of Eastern Fairfield County. In addition to his involvement with Dartmouth, Michael was a Founding Member of the New York University Alumni Association and served as a member of its Board of Directors for more than 20 years. He was a member of The Yale Club of New York City, Darien Men’s Association and The Country Club of Darien. Michael enjoyed golf, swimming and music.

Michael is survived by his loving wife, Mary Beth, as well as his sisters-in-law and brothers-in-law, Winifred and Thomas Lom and Margaret and Stephen Connelly of Darien, and Karen and Richard Lombardo of East Hills, New York. He is also survived by his nieces and nephews, Andrew Lom and his wife, Terry Wasserman-Lom, Stacy and Courtney Lom, Jessica and James Connelly, and Katie Lombardo.

Burial was private at Lakeview Cemetery in New Canaan. A Memorial Mass will be held on June 3, 2017 at 10:30 am at St. Thomas More Church in Darien. Donations in memory of Michael may be made to the American Cancer Society, P.O. Box 42040, Oklahoma City, OK 73123 or online at Cancer.org/Donate.

September 28, 2017
Current Affairs Discussion:
Comprehensive Immigration Reform

Comprehensive Immigration Reform: challenges and problems in accomplishing it.

Discussion leader: Charlie Goodyear

A general history immigration: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration_to_the_United_States

On the 1986 Immigration Act: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration_Reform_and_Control_Act_of_1986

Immigration Reform Act of 2007
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comprehensive_Immigration_Reform_Act_of_2007\

On illegal immigration: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illegal_immigration_to_the_United_States

E-Verify is a government system to verify a workers legal right to work in the US. It seem logical that if illegal immigrants cannot work “above the table” it would discourage immigration. But it is not mandatory: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/make-e-verify-mandatory-when-hiring-and-that-will-help-stop-illegal-immigration-2016-11-02

Also (may want to read the comments following the article): http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/5-things-you-should-know-about-e-verify/

An article from the Economist on the education levels of new immigrants. Also the +/- of a point system. http://www.economist.com/news/united-states/21723108-far-being-low-skilled-half-all-legal-migrants-have-college-degrees-immigration?frsc=dg%7Cc

An article in the current issue of Weekly Standard  hits the spot on immigration enforcement.
http://www.weeklystandard.com/article/2008732 

Without Visas, Carnival Workers Are Trapped at Home in Mexico https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/22/world/americas/mexico-h2b-visas-tlapacoyan-carnivals.html 

 

Happy Wanderers – Fort Washington Outpost – Tuesday, June 6, 2017

EPSON scanner Image

We will be walking the Hudson River Greenway from 181st Street to 165th Street and lunch at Coogan’s Restaurant on Broadway and 164th Street. After lunch is the option to return to Grand Central via the west side subway or walk over the Highbridge to the IRT subway in the Bronx. The trip up and down for the Greenway has some steep inclines so some my be too tired after lunch.

Leader: Taylor Strubinger

John F. Cagnina passes away. May 13, 2017

John Fleming Cagnina, formerly of Rowayton, Conn., passed away peacefully on May 13 in Westerly, R.I., after living happily for three years at StoneRidge, a retirement community in Mystic, Conn. He was two days shy of his 87th birthday. His death was a result of heart disease and dementia.

A 44-year resident of Rowayton, John served as a Commissioner of the Sixth Taxing District and Chair of the Rowayton Civic Association. An enthusiastic skier and sailor, he was a founding member of the Rowayton Yacht Club at Hickory Bluff. He was a long-time member of St. John Church (Darien) where he  was active in its choir, and served on the board of Hill Top Homes, a senior residence, in Rowayton.

Born in the Bronx, N.Y., to P.J. and Margaret Cagnina, John held a B.S. from Fordham University and an MBA from the University of Massachusetts. He was navigator of the destroyer Richard E. Krause and also served at U.S. Naval Headquarters in London, England. John then joined General Electric, where he held a variety of positions. In 1995 he retired from BMW of North America after leading Human Resources for 20 years.

John is survived by his wife of nearly 59 years, Anne Shea Cagnina, their children: Tom, Mary Sweeney (Jim), Jean McCutcheon (Larry), and Matt (Jodi); and six grandchildren: Cate and Robert Rung, Ned and Will McCutcheon, and Max and Brock Cagnina. He was predeceased by his brother, Vincent.

 
A funeral service will be held Tuesday, May 23 at 1:30 p.m. at St. John Church followed by interment in Union Cemetery, Rowayton. A memorial will be held at StoneRidge at a later date. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to Cardinal Hayes High School (Bronx, N.Y.) or Hope Hospice,
Providence, R.I.

Hike Babcock Preserve, Tuesday, May 30, 2017, 10:00

HIKING BABCOCK PRESERVE in GREENWICH, CT

Reschedule from FRIDAY MAY 26, 2017 due to weather.

Our last hike of the season will be on Tuesday, May 30, 2017. We will be hiking the Babcock Preserve which is a 300 acre tract of forested land in Greenwich, north of the Merritt. It is the largest park in Greenwich and consists of several hiking trails over a relatively easy terrain. It was acquired by the Town of Greenwich in 1972, partially by gift and partially by purchase from the Babcock Family.
At this time of the year the park is a particularly pretty lush green with its tranquillity interrupted only by the chirping of birds. We plan to hike about 3.5 miles and be done by 12.30pm. Half this trail is relatively flat with the balance consisting of a not too strenuous gentle slope.
As usual wives and significant others are welcome.
After the hike we will have lunch (optional) at the Asiana Bistro, a fusion Asian restaurant located at 844 High Ridge Road in Stamford.

DIRECTIONS

From the south-bound Merritt Parkway take Exit 31 (North St). At the top of the exit ramp make a left turn on to North St-north. About half a mile down the road on the left will be the clearly marked entrance to Babcock Preserve. There is ample parking. Meet there at 10.00am on 5/26/17.

Contact: Sunil Saksena. ssaksena44@gmail.com, 203-561-8601

Jim Armour’s memorial service will be held Saturday, May 20th, 2017 at St Lukes, 1:00 to 3:30.

His obituary is on a separate post.

James Armour, 86, Marketer, Korean War Vet, Darien Men’s Association Member

James Stephen Armour died in Stamford on Oct. 7, 2016, at the age of 86. He is survived by his wife, former Darien Representative Town Meeting Moderator Karen Ahlberg Armour.

Jim Armour’s memorial service will be held Saturday, May 20th at St Lukes, 1:00 to 3:30.

Jim was born on Jan. 27, 1930, in Brooklyn, and grew up in Larchmont, N.Y., where he met lifelong friends and fly-fishing buddies Larry Rosenstadt, Ed Nusbaum, and Joe Andress; became an Eagle Scout; and graduated from Mamaroneck High School.

Jim earned a bachelor of arts in political science from Syracuse University, where he was a proud member of Alpha Phi Omega, the only non-sectarian and racially integrated fraternity operating on campus at that time.

He was profoundly affected by his U.S. Army service in the Korean War and recounted many spellbinding stories of his more-than-a-year’s time in active combat. Jim earned a master’s of business administration from Cornell University and went on to build a career in marketing and sales in the paper and printing industries.

He met Karen at a Kentucky Derby party in Manhattan, and they married in 1966. They settled in Darien, where they raised their daughters and, later, he became an enthusiastic member of the Darien Men’s Association.

Jim and Karen continued the party throughout their 50 years of marriage. After they retired, they began spending summers surrounded by friends and their growing family on beautiful Lake Massawippi in North Hatley, Quebec.

Jim adored being a father and was endlessly proud of his daughters’ professional accomplishments, expertise, and talents. Family and friends will remember him for his wisdom, dance moves, charades prowess, and relentless sense of humor (affectionately known as “pun-ishment”), among many other things.

He was a kind, caring person and a devoted dog owner. In addition to trout fishing, playing golf, and listening to music, Jim enjoyed boating, and he always said that his first job — as a launchman at the local yacht club when he was a teenager — was his favorite.

In addition to his wife, Jim is survived by three daughters: Rabbi Victoria Armour-Hileman of Atlanta; Allison Armour-Garb (Bradley) of Slingerlands, New York; and Julie Armour (Tom Jones) of Summit, N.J.; and grandchildren Isabel, Zev, Charlie, and Carson. He was predeceased by his sister, Jacqueline Armour, and by his parents, Beatrice Peters (née Kalt) and David Armour.

A memorial service is being planned for later in the fall, as well as a private burial in North Hatley next summer.

The family would particularly like to thank Jim’s caregiver Dieula Fleury for her loving encouragement. In lieu of flowers, donations in Jim’s honor can be made to Darien EMS-Post 53.

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